Dangerous Occurrence

Definition(s)


Dangerous occurrence

Dangerous occurrence has the meaning given by subregulation 2.41 (2).

Source: Offshore Petroleum and Greenhouse Gas Storage (Safety) Regulations 2009 (Select Legislative Instrument 2009 No. 382 as amended), Australia, prepared on 1 January 2012. Regulations

 

Dangerous occurence

For the definition of dangerous occurrence in clause 3 of Schedule 3 to the Act, an occurrence, at a facility, that is specified in the following table is a dangerous occurrence.

  1. An occurrence that did not cause, but could reasonably have caused:
    1. the death of, or serious personal injury to, a person; or
    2. a member of the workforce to be incapacitated from performing work for the period mentioned in subregulation (1)
  2. A fire or explosion
  3. A collision of a marine vessel with the facility
  4. An uncontrolled release of hydrocarbon vapour exceeding 1 kilogram
  5. An uncontrolled release of petroleum liquids exceeding 80 litres
  6. A well kick exceeding 8 cubic metres (or 50 barrels)
  7. An unplanned event that required the emergency response plan to be implemented
  8. Damage to safety-critical equipment
  9. An occurrence to which items 1 to 8 do not apply that:
    1. results in significant damage to a pipeline (for example, reducing the capacity of the pipeline to contain petroleum or greenhouse gas substance flowing through it); or
    2. is likely to have a result of a kind mentioned in paragraph (a); or
    3. is of a kind that a reasonable pipeline licensee would consider to require immediate investigation
  10. Any other occurrence of a kind that a reasonable operator would consider to require an immediate investigation.

Note: The meaning of facility is explained in subregulation 1.5 (1).

Source: Offshore Petroleum and Greenhouse Gas Storage (Safety) Regulations 2009 (Select Legislative Instrument 2009 No. 382 as amended), Australia, prepared on 1 January 2012. Regulations

 

Dangerous occurence

Dangerous occurrence means an occurrence declared by the regulations to be a dangerous occurrence for the purposes of this definition.

Source: Offshore Petroleum and Greenhouse Gas Storage Act 2006, Australia, amended 2012. Legislation

 

Dangerous occurence

In this regulation, dangerous occurrence means any of the following events that arose out of or in connection with petroleum operations:
(a) an event that did not cause, but might reasonably have caused, a major accident:
(b) a well kick that either—
(i) exceeded 8 cubic metres (or 50 barrels); or
(ii) required the well to be shut-in:
(c) an uncontrolled release of hydrocarbon vapour exceeding 1 kilogram:
(d) an uncontrolled release of petroleum liquids exceeding 80 litres:
(e) the failure of any part of a well whose failure would cause or contribute to, or whose purpose is to prevent or limit the effect of, the unintentional release of fluids from a well or a reservoir being drawn on by a well:
(f) damage to, or failure of, a safety-critical element that required intervention to ensure it will operate as designed:
(g) a fire or explosion at an installation:
(h) the uncontrolled or unintentional release or escape of any substance (other than petroleum) on or from an installation, where that release or escape had the potential to cause death or serious harm to any person:
(i) an unintended collapse of—
(i) an installation; or
(ii) any part of an installation; or
(iii) any plant on an installation, where that collapse jeopardised, or could have jeopardised, the integrity of the installation:
(j) subsidence or local collapse of the seabed or ground that could have affected the foundations, or the integrity, of an installation:
(k) an unplanned event (other than a false alarm) that required the emergency response plan to be implemented:
(l) damage to an installation, caused by adverse weather conditions, earthquakes, or other natural events, that had the potential to cause death or serious harm of any person: (m) a collision between a vessel, aircraft, or vehicle and an installation that resulted in damage to the installation, the vessel, the aircraft, or the vehicle:
(n) a failure of equipment required to maintain a floating offshore installation on station:
(o) an incident involving loss of stability or buoyancy of a floating offshore installation.

Source: Health and Safety in Employment (Petroleum Exploration and Extraction) Regulations 2013, SR 2013/208, New Zealand, as of May 2013. Regulations